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If you had a time machine, what's a piece of advice you'd give yourself?

This week I started as a BDR in an amazing start up and a large part of my role will be cold calling. If you had a time machine, what piece of advice would you go back and tell yourself about cold calling?

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    • Profile picture of Mary Green 🔹
      @marygreencny
      ( 5k POINTS )
      1 month, 1 week ago

      Hi @devon, congrats on the new position, I hope it’s an interesting role for you. When I had to do cold calling three things helped,

      1) It’s not personal (but that’s pretty obvious)
      2) Just keep going, get rejected? Pick up the phone and make the next call, it’s so much harder when you stop and have to come back to it
      3) Take care of your mental health, self esteem, work on your confidence, etc.

      You can do it!

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Thank you so much @marygreencny. I really appreciate your insight and will definitely remember to these three things going forward. It’s a new role, in a new industry and I am extremely excited. Have a great week.

    • Profile picture of Macky Bradley
      @mackybradley
      ( 6.9k POINTS )
      1 month, 1 week ago

      Hi Devon! @devon
      First of all, Congratulations in your new role at the new start up- how cool! Wish you all the best.
      Simply this: Be the very BEST Cold caller that you can be. Be authentic, and provide value in everything that you do. Be accountable. Provide detailed notes in your CRM, where if you have to go to court on these notes, 7 years from now, you could state what happened. Notice the trends- everything in this world is about the trends. Learn as much as you can about your company and their product, and especially the people. It is all about the relationships.
      Lastly, determine what is best for you to notate information. Like a large Excel sheet or Google Doc.
      There will be a huge amount of information coming your way. (Like if somebody shares an article, demo, youtube, etc. Have a place to store this info. The reason being it is easy to find, and easy to share.
      Become the best at what you can be and don’t look back! Also, take 5 minutes to prepare for the next day, before you leave.
      I hope this has been extremely helpful and best wishes on your new career!
      Go break some records! BOOM!

      Macky

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Thank you for your insights! I will definitely take the time to take detailed notes. I love the idea of taking 5 minutes at the end of the day. I started the Bullet Journal system a few months ago, and this has become a regular part of everyday and I enjoy it.

    • Profile picture of Scott Barker
      @scott-barker
      ( 2k POINTS )
      1 month, 1 week ago

      A couple thoughts:

      1. Remember that your prospects are just like you. They go home, flick on netflix and order Doordash for the 4th time that week. Imagine them as your parents and you’re just illuminating a problem they may have.
      2. Be incredibly humble and people will want to help you. When someone brushes you off say “yknow what I totally understand. Hey, I’m really trying to get better at this…is there anything I could have said or done differently that would have resulted in a meeting with you?”
      3. People want to feel understood more than anything else in life. You goal is to try to show them you understand their world in as little time as possible.

      I hope that is helpful.

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Thanks! I’m going to write down your second point and keep it close by. I can that being very effective and I love getting feedback.

    • Profile picture of Bob Buckley
      @buck7287
      ( 550 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      I would have figured out the biggest possible pain point that my company’s product would solve for customers and mention that right away if I got someone on the phone. There were a few different things that I could have talked about, but over time I learned that it was best to try and find out their biggest problem that we could solve and set a meeting about fixing that.

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Thanks. I am still doing mock calls, and will incorporate this into a scenario tomorrow.

        • Profile picture of Bob Buckley
          @buck7287
          ( 550 POINTS )
          1 month ago

          Cool! It’s one of those things that definitely takes some time to get good at depending on your industry.

    • Profile picture of Colin Campbell
      @colin-campbell
      ( 4.4k POINTS )
      1 month ago

      I don’t quite know how I’d recommend to put this one into action, but I swear I started understanding how to sell better the instant I had budget of my own.

      I updated my title on LinkedIn to Director, and started getting lots and lots of cold calls and emails myself, and started noticing things I used to do that worked (or didn’t work at all).

      Funny how actually being in the other person’s shoes makes a big difference.

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Maybe I should give myself a promotion on LinkedIn lol I love listening to other people’s calls, I think it’s very effective and a great way to learn.

    • Profile picture of Matt Flamman
      @mattflamman
      ( 420 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Be a student during buyer discovery and expert in your value prop.

    • Profile picture of tom.castley
      @tom-castley
      ( 280 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Everything everyone has already said, plus get some training… I’ve found Sandler to be best for cold calling cause it’s like sheet music… not too prescriptive… also ensure you listen back to your calls… you’ll see just how much you’ve missed during calls…

    • Profile picture of Dan Judy
      @danjudy
      ( 230 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Take one minute and research the company you are calling. Check on LinkedIn to see if the can get the Decision Makers name before you call. And be yourself. Have a script, but don’t be a robot.

    • Profile picture of Max Warren
      @maxwarren68
      ( 290 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Hey Devon, congrats! on landing the new position. Here are a few things to keep in mind that will help you in the role.
      Pace yourself; Sometimes the learning and the doing take time to sync up. Staying open and in the “student” role will help you feel like you are gaining traction and contributing early on.
      Be curious; At the hear of every good conversation and interaction is genuine curiosity. This is the best way I can describe keeping the human factor in your calls and conversations. Ask questions and listen to what’s important for the prospective client.
      Make a friend of anyone who is not your DM; You’ll encounter admins. Executive assistants and tons of other people as you call. The best thing you can say to them is I was wondering if you could help me? People want to help and that’s a great way to get them in your corner.
      Record your call; Sometimes this can be tough to do and you’ll need to honor the laws and other privacy, but if you can record your calls (or have a mechanism to record and analyze them) Listen to yourself and notice the ebb and flow of the conversation. What is working and what needs to be improved upon?
      Ask for Coaching; As you are learning and evolving in your role make sure you take advantage of any coaching, support and accountability that will help you.
      Best of Luck and remember you’ve got this.

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Thanks for all the great advice. I am part of an incredible team who has been very supportive and have provided feedback and coaching at every opportunity. I have listened to myself a few times and one I get over the cringe of hearing my own voice, I agree, its a great way to learn and see where there are opportunities to improve. Thank you again.

    • Profile picture of Dale Duppong
      @dale
      ( 230 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Though cold calling is a critical step in the relationship building process, you don’t spend all of your time there! It is important to always come back to it, but know that you will have many enjoyable experiences working closer to your prospects, clients and closer to the money. Embrace it and excel at it:)
      Dale Duppong

    • Profile picture of Daniel Owens
      @danowens
      ( 350 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Hi @devon, congratulations on your new role. I’m sure you will smash it!

      My advice is simply enjoy it! Cold calling is fun, it’s challenging, it allows you to learn, grow, see what works and what doesn’t and most importantly, it’s a numbers game. The best part is, the longer you do it, the better you get.

      I have been in sales for 21 years and have coached many teams of very talented sales people. The ones who enjoy what they do, are the successful ones. The fear of rejection is far worse than rejection itself. As you grow in your career, you’ll find that you will always have to enter into negotiations or conversations from cold. It’s a good thing.

      Lastly – congratulations on your first cold call sale – which you will make on your first day! Enjoy!

      Dan

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Thank you Dan! I look forward to messaging you my first day and telling you I made my first sale.

    • Profile picture of Tushar Shah
      @tushar_shah
      ( 210 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Do your homework before calling. What I mean is, if I am calling Financial Services company, understand 1 or 2 Business Problems you have solved for other FSI clients and what was the value your solution brought to your customers. Reference sell and make as many calls you can and always ask questions. Try to find out what thier issues/challenges they are trying to solve today. Don’t lead with what your company & products solves without first understanding their pain. Imagine your a doctor, looking for the pain and than apply the proper medicine to solve their pain! Good Luck!!

    • Profile picture of Tom Horne
      @thorne1978
      ( 740 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Develop a system that works for you.
      I personally liked to breakup my big outreach numbers into consumable pieces. I do 20 call blocks, then get up and go for a walk, talk to someone and not think about calling. Then come back and do 10-20 more. I’d always run circles around the colleagues as I had more energy and mental focus when I was doing calls.
      – Also, not sure what you sell but get a conversation going, don’t sell a product sell the conversation > sell the appointment don’t sell your product. What’s interesting to person answering? Thats more of a consultative approach that may or may not work with whatever product you sell. Even then, they need to have a problem to be solved for them to buy your product so I guess it still checks out 🙂
      – Confidence, people answering can sniff out a caller. You are a Badass Devon so don’t go soft at anyone, they’re just a person so do your job with confidence and conviction.

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        This is great advice. Working from home, I have definitely noticed my physical activity has decreased so incorporating walks into my day will be very beneficial.

    • Profile picture of Rick Ingavo
      @rickingavo
      ( 210 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Congrats @devon! I hope you find Sales/Business development equally as rewarding as its been for me!

      A couple things that I think would help a younger me:

      1.) Don’t wait to be perfect/know everything to get on the phone.
      2.) Don’t be afraid of failing, its the best way to learn!

      You got this!

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Thank you very much! Looks like I’ll be making calls next week and I’ll keep this in mind.

    • Profile picture of Anna Whittlestone
      @awhi
      ( 220 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Hi @devon congrats on the new role!
      1. Don’t find excuses! When I started out I found tons of excuses of why I shouldn’t contact a lead. Just contact them anyway!
      2. Be eager to learn! Ask if you can listen to others and if they could listen in on your calls and give you feedback.
      3. It might not be the most fun, but if you set yourself a goal (eg. becoming the best coldcaller, having the best conversion, etc.) I feel it can be much more fun!

      Good luck! 🙂

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Our calls are recorded, so I took your advice and listened to a couple of mine and it was very insightful. Thank you.

    • Profile picture of Lawrence Jackman
      @lj
      ( 250 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Call early and call late. Most important. Your energy is at it’s best early in the morning and you can be more focused. If you hear a no or not interested, get excited you are doing your job well. The yesses are around the corner. Repetition is the mother of learning.

    • Profile picture of Ken Hauck
      @sellingissimple
      ( 240 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Building RELATIONSHIPS is extremely important to long-term sales success–harder to do on the phone than in person. However, an unlimited amount of information is available on-line (firms and individuals) today, so do some research. Building TRUST in a hurry without the Suspect (let’s not call them a Prospect too soon) actually seeing you is a challenge, so be genuine, be kind and be humble. Also, do some reading on Principles of Persuasion by Dr. Robert Cialdini. When i get an email or phone call from someone who has, I can immediately tell the difference in the tone–the contact is just more inviting.

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        I just put a few his books on hold at the library. Thank you.

    • Profile picture of Sean Conrad
      @seanconrad
      ( 230 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      The number one thing is that all of the things that work will be uncomfortable. The only way to be successful is to script tightly and to be as consistent as possible in what you say and how you say it over a large enough data set that you can measure what works. That means learning what will get you the most meetings set that hold per day/week/month/quarter. The trick is that the things you say and do that deliver the highest results are NEVER what feels best. They are seldom what experienced sales reps, sales leaders and sales trainers/experts say they are. To choose one example, the most effective call opener in terms of setting meetings that show will get you hung up on slightly more and you will have shorter conversations on average, but nothing beats this opener for meetings set, show rate, and closing for the next step in the sales process. Don’t trust your feelings or any run of a few calls. You must always stay consistent for 50 conversations and then look at meetings set that hold.

      I have something concrete for you. Three 15-minute podcast episodes that will share the best call opener we have tested, the psychology behind why we think it works, and how to look at hang-ups as a good thing.

      Stranger Things In Sales: https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-icpwi-c34ccb
      Don’t Make The Spiders Angry: https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-7af3d-c36d35
      The Power of the Anti-Curse to Overcome Rejection: https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-h3usd-dd0825

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        This is such a great perspective and very helpful. Thank you for the podcast links as well.

    • Profile picture of Paul Cuomo
      @bronxtrader
      ( 240 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Devon. Congratulations. I wish you the best of luck. Make sure you measure everything! Every technique and strategy you try, measure its effectiveness. There are lots of books and I am sure you are going to get lots of training on how to cold call. It can be daunting. Make sure cold calling is part of a bigger picture marketing initiative. You have lots of tools at your disposal this day and age, make the best of them.

      Finally, become an expert on your product as soon as you can. When you are an expert, then you are a consultant…that is who people want to talk to.

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Thank you for sharing. We have so many tools and I am excited to use them and find out what works.

    • Profile picture of Clive Miller
      @clive-miller
      ( 210 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Hi Devon,

      What a great question.

      Only call people with an immediate need for what you are selling.

      Back in my early cold calling days circa 1979/80 it was possible to do this, even then. We had business directories. Today you have Google and all manner of research tools.

      I am delivering a free B2B sales training course via my LinkedIn company page. Sections 2 to 4 provide a step-by-step guide for identifying those who need what you sell, right now. It is open to any LinkedIn member. Just look up my name and SalesSense.

      Good luck. The more you practice, the luckier you will get.

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Thank you. I’ll be sure to check out your LinkedIn page.

    • Profile picture of Jack Welch
      @jackwelchwr250
      ( 380 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Cold calling, my view is it’s very hard, consistently frustrating, and can yield highly qualified leads when done right. One thing I learned from some great prospectors at IBM.
      “Sell the meeting, not the solution”. I started as a systems engineer and we had a pipe quota each quarter. We would try to study our tech notes so we’d be ready for any question the prospect could ask. (Wrong!, that doesn’t secure sales meetings). What we started studying was how to have a 2 minute conversation that offered up the known challenges (concise use Case format works great) for our buyer, IBM’s value prop, and shameless name dropping of a one of their too competitors who used our solution, a public use case works great here. We offered up a relevant asset and to have our experts on a call or on-site whenever they needed, and we could answer their questions, show off the product etc.. we didn’t offer a demo, we offered a discovery discussion that might include a demo if it was appropriate.
      We started to land more meetings, that led to more trials (more tryin is more buyin!)
      What did I learn back then? We defined how we structured our discussions around our briefings, not our sw. or “A good seller doesn’t always need to know what to say, but a good seller should always know what to ask”.

      Hope this helps!
      Jack

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Shameless name dropping lol Thank you. I will be sure to you this technique.

    • Profile picture of Michael Warady
      @michaelwarady
      ( 190 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Congratulations @devon! Very excited for you. The advise that is given so far is absolutely spot on! Keep your head up, definitely don’t take it personally, sit up straight. Like the others have said, don’t hesitate to pick up the phone. Believe me, you won’t do anything that all of us haven’t done a thousand times.. both for the good calls and the not so good ones.

      Also, keep a mirror in front of you and smile on every dial. I know it sounds weird, and even feels weird when you first do it, but people can hear your smile on the phone.
      Most of all, have fun.

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Smile and dial… done!

    • Profile picture of Bobby Garmon
      @bgarmon
      ( 210 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      My advice to you with cold calling is to make the call as warm as possible. Before my calls, I strive to know as much about the person and the company that I’m calling. I take to the time to research the prospect, who do I need to reach, what is the status of the business and how I can benefit them. Who will make the decisions, nothing like wasting your time pitching to the wrong player? Understanding your products and how it benefits your prospect. Understanding your competitor’s products and how to outsell them also helps without being negative. The truth is there is no magic bullet but the more knowledge you have the better your close will be.
      My list would be:
      1) Listen- often the prospect will lead you to the sell
      2) Stop Talking – don’t talk yourself out of a sell
      3) Be a person -people want to do business with a person not a company
      4) Be truthful – people will not forget or forgive
      5) Be respectful

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Thank for the great advice. I tend to talk when I get nervous so I will make a conscience effort to actively listen.

    • Profile picture of Jerimiah Lancaster
      @jerimiahlee
      ( 490 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Devon – Congrats! Very exciting. I could literally write a book on this but @jacco & @trish-bertuzzi already did.

      If I could only do one thing again, it would be to learn everything about your existing customers. Study why they are customers, why they are using your platform, what makes them happy, what challenge does it solve for them, how do they use it day to day, who signed the agreement, who initially reached out, etc. Become to expert on the why.

      From there you can now build a similar target list in your patch, develop account maps, create qual/disco questions that address their needs, create strong emails, and eventually turn into SQLs!

      The other piece of advice I’d give myself is practice more. Practice daily. Do as many role plays with peers and AE’s as possible and then do them with your CRO, CEO, and anyone else who has 10 mins.

      Good luck! You’ve got this!

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Everyone at my company has been extremely generous with their time and even my mom has offered to be a cold call prospect! I will continue to practice going forward.

    • Profile picture of Chris Hatfield
      @notanothersalesguy
      ( 270 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Hi @devon,
      Congrats on the new role first of all.

      A couple things from me:
      1) don’t get emotionally attached to the outcome, biggest mistake a lot of sales people make. You can’t control the outcome, but you can control the process.
      2) Always ask yourself, how am I Interrupting this person’s pattern on each call? As in how am I standing out amongst the noise.

    • Profile picture of Trent Dyrsmid
      @trentdyrsmid
      ( 440 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Hi Devon….I’ve made MANY cold calls in my career and was so good at it, that Jame Clear wrote an article about my strategy to make it easier. Here’s the link https://jamesclear.com/paper-clips

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        This is great. I can’t wait to share with my team. Now, where to get some paperclips….

    • Profile picture of Michael Harrison
      @mikeyharrison
      ( 1k POINT )
      1 month ago

      Hi @devon,

      Congrats on the new position!

      So I certainly agree with a lot of the advice that has been given so far, especially not taking anything personally. You never know what the person on the other side is going through or how their day is going, so there may be times they take their frustration out on you. All you can do is keep your head up and keep dialing.

      Further, what I have found that has worked for me is complete humility with your prospect. Many prospects will know that it is a cold call and will tune you out right away. When you end your call with a call to action and you get the classic, “sorry I am not interested at this time,” I have found that asking your prospect how you may have done better or if they have any feedback for you, can not only help with future calls but can sometimes continue the conversation which eventually may turn into a meeting.

      Hope this helps!

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Thanks for the insight. I will definitely do this.

    • Profile picture of Farren Neu
      @farrenneu
      ( 550 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Understand your prospect’s problems as well (or better) than they do so that you can engage them through empathy (and earn their trust).

      Understand your competitor landscape so that you know who your prospects are already using/evaluating and how you’re different/better.

      When you don’t know the answer to something, don’t try to fumble for it. Tell your prospects “I don’t know” and recommend they set a meeting to dig in further.

      Tune in obsessively to how your prospects react in conversation — notice when there is a slight pause, a brush-off answer, a detailed response — everything. Notate what you did to get those reactions and fine-tune your call formula according to what makes your prospects’ ears perk up and what gets them talking.

      Ask one or two thoughtful and relevant discovery questions to really get your prospects talking. The call is only memorable to them if they had a stake in it. Otherwise, they may feel less invested in showing up for the meeting.

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Thank you for such an insightful response.

    • Profile picture of Martin Stevens
      @martin-e-stevens
      ( 220 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Congrats Devon.
      You’ve already got some great advice (and some not so great – hopefully you’ll figure out which is which as you go).
      The very best bit I’ve read is to know your own clients. Know their stories – specifically understand what situation were they most commonly in before your company helped them – and what different state are they in now that you have helped them.
      When cold calling – no one, and I mean NO ONE wants to know HOW you could help them (counter-intuitive I know). You are simply there to identify companies that are in a similar state to those your existing clients were in before you helped them – and to ascertain if they would like to be in a the same state your customers are in AFTER you’ve helped them (in other words – the middle bit doesn’t matter)..
      One thing no-one has mentioned that is vitally important to your on-going success – get an Up Front Contract (a Sandler Training term) for an agreement of your prospects time. Too many cold callers start with “Hi I’m Devon, The reason for my call today is… blah blah blah”. It’s a very rude way to begin. Instead, just ask for your prospects time; “Hi Jim, this is a cold call you won’t be delighted to hear – can i have just 30 seconds to explain why I suspect you might be my ideal client – if I’m wrong you can slam the phone down on me, but if I’m right, you might decide we should keep talking – sound fair?”
      Then you have 30 seconds to find their pain – I’m going to assume your company is sensible enough to have given you a tight ICP with the right persona – if so, you should have a fair idea what might be irking them.
      State three outcomes they haven’t achieved because each outcome is blocked by a problem. This should take no more than 45 seconds and should be the only totally scripted part of your call (despite what advise others have given you).
      If you want to know what this looks like in real life – find Becc Holland’s online training called Flip The Script – it’s the best investment of your time you will ever make.
      Good luck!
      martin

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Martin, thank you for such a great response. I love your opener and I hope you don’t mind, I’m going to use it! I thing the “sound fair” part is great, because who is going to say “That’s not fair!”

    • Profile picture of James Coelho
      @jamescoe
      ( 370 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Hi Devon,
      Make a list of the those you intend to call tomorrow. Then send them (TODAY) all a brief note of your company and key features of your product or service. This will serve as a headsup when you call them. Easier recognition and better connect on the cold call.
      All the best !

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Great idea. Thank you for sharing.

    • Profile picture of Gunjan Yogendra
      @gunjany
      ( 280 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Hi Devon, congratulations on landing a new role in a new industry! This itself is very challenging – I mean the industry especially.
      So, I’d like to start with reading about the industry – its challenges, pain points, high and low troughs. How the industry shaped up, top players, …. basically the lay of the land.

      Next, I will be given a list of target people, and the pitch.

      So, think about the pitch and the company you are working for. What drives the company, the pitch, the positioning and the need for it in the market. Then prepare a solid call script. Should be not more than a 2/3 of page long.

      The most compelling piece comes next: Not all people will be the right target – many will turn up saying -“eh, sorry, I am not the right person.” Which brings us back to the list. Strike out the names with least probability to say ‘yes, I am interested to meet and talk further.’

      Dialling names 10 times in a day bring in the risk of your name been banned. Right timings are early mornings (8-9 am ET) and evenings (4:30- 5 PM ET). But in a pandemic, just before lunch has proven to be a good time to connect. Keep the country map and time zones in mind before calling.

      I guess, that is it for the moment from me – Happy calling and wish you the very best in your new role! Congratulations once again!

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Thank you! Great advice.

    • Profile picture of Aazar Shad
      @aazarshad
      ( 200 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      – Learn empathy and be respectful even though people won’t be.
      – You have 10 seconds when someone picks up the call. How can you grab their attention in those 10 seconds?
      – Research, research, and research. Like really know what is the “pain that person is going through right now”.
      -99 out 100 say no, but 1 say yes. Celebrate that.
      – Your job is to make that person listen first, then book a meeting. Cold calling is hard, so make every word count.

    • Profile picture of Inge Boonen
      @inge
      ( 290 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Call reluctance is a real thing, therefore:

      * Make sure you have a script that you feel comfortable with, and try to role-play often
      * Don’t overthink it, hit the phone early in the morning before you check your mailbox, so you get some dials in and can feel good about yourself
      * With each no, realize that you have learned something, and that the next yes is around the corner.

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Thank you. Your early morning advice has been echoed above and I will definitely be setting my alarm to be ready to go at 8am.

    • Profile picture of Annika Ehrig
      @girheakinna
      ( 340 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Don’t put it off until the last minute!

    • Profile picture of Joanne Webb
      @joannew
      ( 490 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Hi. Congrats and good luck on your job. I have been doing cold calling for a long time. One thing I found that helps is to be yourself and see what works. Sometimes you have to adjust pitch. What I have found helped me is I try to think of them and be respectful of their time. I try to provide value and usually I cold call on something specific like an event, webinar etc. Don’t take it personal. Do a little research on them to the best of your knowledge to see if they are a fit or partial match for your product or service.

    • Profile picture of Tamara Parker
      @tamaraparker
      ( 200 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Congrats @devon

      I would say something my manger told me that has stuck with me all these years….. The worse they can say or do is no, it’s not personal, and have fun! Someone will say yes eventually!

    • Profile picture of Cheryl Banks
      @ccbanks67
      ( 200 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Congratulations on your new role.
      Cold calling is a lot of fun, and a lot of work.
      My advice is to keep smiling while you are talking and be respectful of people’s time.
      If they can’t chat now nail down another time when you can call back before hanging up.
      Then send and email to confirm your next call. Now your next call with them is not a cold call.
      Be fearless, keep calling, it is a test.
      Don’t get discouraged.
      All the best .

    • Profile picture of jakebernstein21
      @jakebernstein21
      ( 1.8k POINTS )
      1 month ago

      I like where @bgarmon was going with his response.

      I would add: learn how to ask great questions. SPIN Selling is probably a great resource, but I found this it just takes a lot of time and practice to ask compelling, impact-driven and non-superficial questions to drive conversations and relationships forward.

      I recently read something about treating a sales conversation like you are filming a documentary and that resonated with me. Always be curious and try to dig a little deeper.

      • Profile picture of Devon Banks
        @devon
        ( 820 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Great metaphor. I will do that. Thank you.

    • Profile picture of Jeff Swan
      @jeffswan18
      ( 720 POINTS )
      4 weeks ago

      Hi @devon,

      Congrats on the new role!

      I would say that the best piece of advice I’ve ever heard was stolen from Nike: “Just do it”

      Too many people overthink the phones, but if you can just get up and make a call, you’re winning half the battle.

      The other half?

      Be helpful!

      If you’re calling on a person with the sole purpose of selling them your solution, it’ll come across in your pitch.

      People don’t like being SOLD, but they do like being HELPED, and you should have confidence that your solution at LevelJump does just that – it helps!

      Best,
      Jeff

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