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How do I break through the noise with LinkedIn Messages? Any examples where it has worked to drive a purchase?

There is such a high number of people complaining about the messages they receive on LinkedIn. I'm brainstorming ways to break through the noise.

Can you share experiences and best practices (either as the buyer or the seller) where LinkedIn messaging drove a purchase?

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    • Profile picture of Trenton Engle
      @tengle
      ( 1.6k POINTS )
      1 month ago

      I never send messages myself, but I have heard a lot of good things about using their voice messaging with the phone app as far as connecting with prospects.

      • Profile picture of Mike Berens
        @mberens
        ( 500 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Good Idea, I wonder if there’s a way to do that through the computer.

        • Profile picture of marygreencny
          @marygreencny
          ( 3.1k POINTS )
          1 month ago

          @scott-barker would probably know.

        • Profile picture of AJ Alonzo
          @ajalonzo
          ( 2.1k POINTS )
          1 month ago

          Pretty sure it has to be done on the mobile app. But I can vouch for its success! Definitely give it a shot.

    • Profile picture of Marissa Walden
      @marissa_wal
      ( 260 POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Personally, I see a lot more success when I start a conversation centered around something non-work related I thought was interesting on their LinkedIn.

      For example, commenting on their background photo, a charity they’ve volunteered at, their hobbies, or (my personal favorite) asking about their experience studying abroad. This has opened the door many times for a more open conversation.

    • Profile picture of marygreencny
      @marygreencny
      ( 3.1k POINTS )
      1 month ago

      What if you start off by commenting on something they’ve recently responded to and begin the conversation that way? This goes back to the debate on whether it’s better to do ABM or network and produce leads that way. I know ABM can work very well, but there’s something to be said about finding leads more naturally through networking too as people tend to be open to discussions more that way. What do you think @mberens?

      • Profile picture of Mike Berens
        @mberens
        ( 500 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        That seems like a great way to build rapport. I’ll incorporate this more, thanks!

    • Profile picture of Scott Barker
      @scott-barker
      ( 1.4k POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Mike – are you creating content as well as trying to book meetings?

      Without that piece, all the best advice in the world wont get you where you want to go. You need to be showing yo.

      I look at LinkedIn as more of an inbound channel (or listening tool) than an outbound channel. It’s about getting them into your web, getting them familiar with you and listening to understand what they care about.
      That being said, if you’ve been connected for a few months. You have thoughtfully engaged with their content, they have thoughtfully engaged with your content then there’s nothing wrong with sending a quick LinkedIn voice note (these stand out right now). Saying something like

      “Hey, your latest post on “x” got me thinking and I realized we’ve never actually connected. I’ve been really digging your stuff – up for a quick zoom later this week to swap strategies?”

      That’s what works for me and has also worked on me.

      I hope that’s helpful man, best of luck.

      Scott

      • Profile picture of Scott Barker
        @scott-barker
        ( 1.4k POINTS )
        1 month ago

        *up

      • Profile picture of Mike Berens
        @mberens
        ( 500 POINTS )
        1 month ago

        Yes, I’ve been posting content and engaging on for some time now. I have yet to do any self promotion. I’ve been helping others as much as possible.

        I appreciate your thought out advice. I’ll start keeping track of who I’m engaging with and send them message.

    • Profile picture of Macky Bradley
      @mackybradley
      ( 5k POINTS )
      1 month ago

      Hi @mberens Mike,
      I agree with @scott-barker . I did do a Social Media Project at my former company where I did exclusive reach out via LinkedIn, also did my own product videos, etc. While we got a lot of comments and responses, we were not provided with a budget to automate or track responses through our inbounds and tie them to our program. Get creative. Spend 5 minutes on the company’s profile or your connections profile. Start a personal conversation the first couple of times (and be sure and record what was said- for those CRM’s that don’t integrate with LI.) then ask them if they have seen or heard about your services on the 3rd or 4th try. Try different messaging. It takes a bit, but it does attract them like Scott says to your website. Just make sure marketing informs you when they do.
      I hope this helps.
      Thanks for the question.

      Macky
      PS. Yes, by the way, I have been using LI since early 2007, and it is getting comical. It is more political than anything. It is constantly being hacked and it is truly hard to believe the content on this platform.
      Cheers!

    • Profile picture of Jake McGaw
      @jakemcgaw
      ( 1.2k POINTS )
      1 month ago

      The short answer is; Be Human. Not a robotic sales machine.

      Think “How would I like someone to approach me”.

      From my own experiences, here is a list of don’ts.
      – Don’t send a connection that is false then try and pitch them right away. It doesn’t work. Just don’t pitch and connect haha!
      – Don’t be impersonal.
      – Don’t like everything single thing they post then message in the hopes they’ll get back to you.
      – Don’t write long paragraphs. 500 characters max.
      – Don’t “Just following you up” someone.

      Here is a list of do’s (where i’ve seen success):
      – Comment on their posts where you have a point of view. (“Congrats” & “Great Share” doesn’t count).
      – If you use their product, message them and tell them about your experience. People love feedback.
      – If they post a problem that needs a solution, message them and reference how you can solve it. That alone has booked me 3+ meetings in the past 6 months.
      – You more likely than not connect with heaps of professionals within the same industry. Connect them with each other. They won’t forget you.
      – Thank people for their time. If they’ve responded to you, even with a No thanks *insert reason here*, thank them. Sometimes starts don’t align.
      – If you are connecting with someone to sell them an idea, product, story, yourself; tell them that’s why you’re connecting. Don’t lie about it. If they don’t accept, you have your answer. Or send them an email (they may not use LinkedIn)
      – If they are part of a company that raised capital, if they moved roles, if some big event in the news comes up, slide a note that says congratulations. Don’t ask for anything in return. Be genuine about it.

      Everyone on that platform is human. Treat them that way and you’ll smash it.

      Happy hunting 🎯🎯

      • Profile picture of AJ Alonzo
        @ajalonzo
        ( 2.1k POINTS )
        1 month ago

        I love this advice, @jakemcgaw. We’re all human, but when connecting with someone or pitching a product we often forget that fact.

        “Everyone on that platform is human. Treat them that way and you’ll smash it.”

        I’m going to get that painted above my desk 😂

        • Profile picture of Jake McGaw
          @jakemcgaw
          ( 1.2k POINTS )
          1 month ago

          Thanks @ajalonzo. It’s something I need to remember all the time. It definitely pays dividends in the future to remember to be human.

          Glad you got something out of the above.

      • Profile picture of Mike Berens
        @mberens
        ( 500 POINTS )
        3 weeks ago

        @jakemcgaw Great advice. Be human, build a informal relationship, start a conversation.

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