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Good open rates on cold email but 0 replies

Hi everyone,

I started the cold email experiment for our startup. I sent out the first batch of 100 emails. The open rates stand at 25% but no replies yet.

Am I missing something here? What could have gone wrong?

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    • Profile picture of Tom Williams
      @tom
      ( 540 POINTS )
      2 months, 3 weeks ago

      Hi Ashish. First, excellent that you’re measuring.
      Couple comments — Open rates are near meaningless because Gmail automatically downloads & caches your tracking pixel, which counts as an open, even tho the recipient may not have actually opened your email. https://help.litmus.com/article/166-how-are-gmail-opens-reported-within-email-analytics

      Second, the only real effectiveness measure of your message is how many meetings it delivers, and for that you need a way higher sample rate, at least 500.

      Third, this is a real trying time, and I don’t think historical norms can be expected to perform right now, but I’d agree zero leaves space for improvement.

      Hit me up with your pitch if you like tom@dealpoint.io

    • Profile picture of Shubham Sood
      @shubhamsood97
      ( 1.4k POINTS )
      2 months, 2 weeks ago

      Follow up, Follow up, Follow Up!

      You’ll not get a response on your first 2-3 emails. But great work on the open rate.

    • Profile picture of Volodymyr Oleksiienko
      @v-oleksiienko
      ( 360 POINTS )
      2 months, 2 weeks ago

      That is a pretty common problem – and there are several reasons why your emails don’t generate responses. Some of the most obvious ones are: poor email copy, lack of personalization, weak CTA, wrong targeting.

      And here’s what you can do fix that and get more replies:
      1. Double check your audience – are you targeting the right people with your emails? Do they match your ICP?
      2. A/B test different email templates, CTAs, and personalization options to find the approach that works best (here’s a quick guide to help you get started https://reply.io/a-b-testing-outbound-campaigns)
      3. Don’t focus solely on email – add touchpoints across other engagement channels, e.g. LinkedIn, voice calls.
      4. Tailor your sending schedule to the prospect’s time zone (you will be surprised, but this trick alone can get you 70% more responses!)
      5. Be persistent – don’t stop with a single “have you seen my email” message. We’ve seen positive answers even after the 5th or 7th email in the sequence!

      Hope this helps!

    • Profile picture of Alex Gray
      @growthboost
      ( 430 POINTS )
      2 months, 1 week ago

      Not a great open rate. Something missing in the subject line. Keep the email short, just enough to pique interest, but not enough to get bored. Lead with a question based on something you know is a struggle in the market. Stay 100% buyer-centric and only focus on them and their pain point you’re solving for.

      Some of my favorite CTAs are “any interest?”, “can I send more info?”, or “I have some ideas I think would help, when are you available for a 15-minute call?”, or “who is the right person to talk about [result]?”

      Just some food for thought 🙂

    • Profile picture of Neil Ringers
      @nringers
      ( 340 POINTS )
      2 months, 1 week ago

      I would follow that step in the sequence with another step that says ” did you miss my last email”? Create a step that is natural and as if you were writing to one person. Smart people can pick out spam and thoughtless campaigns. If you have the right technology, you might want to cross over to another channel like SMS and send a msg reminding the prospect that they have an email from you to read… ask for a meeting. You have to have a next step action that the prospect needs to own. If all else fails, create a step in the sequence that creates a call reminder or an actual call (you’ll need integration to an outbound call switch) and tie that step to history in your CRM, like Salesforce. Products like Revenue Grid, Salesloft and Outreach can do this. Check ’em out.

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