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How To Win The Revenue Relay Webinar: Continue the Convo!

Hey there!! Tess from Sales Hacker here!

Whether you were able to join us live or wanted to join us async in our latest webinar, let's continue the convo!

Let's tackle the elephant in the room... why is there conflict between Sales & Marketing? And furthermore, how can we mitigate this?

Taft Love, CEO of Iceberg RevOps, said it best - whoever is lowest in the funnel holds the most power.

Is it because of silos? Is it misaligned KPIs?

Let's discuss how and why this happens, and better yet, what we can do to be mindful of this to avoid unhealthy friction.

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      Profile picture of Kendra Fortmeyer
      @kendra-fortmeyer
      ( 808 POINTS )
      1 month, 1 week ago

      I loved this discussion! As a marketing person living in a sales world, I’d like to say the division is because sellers are really competitive, and marketers… are just really good-looking, so naturally everyone hates us.

      But on a more serious note — In every org I’ve been in, misalignment between sales and marketing happens because everyone is SO busy. And even though we ultimately have the same goal (convert leads to dollars), we use such different tools and processes to go about it.

      So my thesis is that we fall out of sync on the KR level of our company-wide OKRs. And because everyone’s (ideally) putting in the work and hustle to achieve their KRs, we don’t take the time to sync up with each other. Compared to the urgency of the day-to-day, cross-departmental meetings feel like a super low priority. It’s a matter of tactics swamping strategy.

      I think! I’d love to hear what my colleagues across the aisle think.

      • 1
        Profile picture of Tess Brown
        @tessbrown
        ( 770 POINTS )
        1 month, 1 week ago

        I chuckled!!!

        But I agree – realigning on KPIs and our north star objectives is imperative to ensure interdepartmental buy in and reduce unnecessary friction. I believe Taft made a great point that some friction is *good friction* because it drives competition and gets us questioning the how/why we do the things we do, but too much friction or unproductive friction ends up stalling all parties!

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