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Ask Any Sales Email Question! w/ Kristina Finseth + Will Allred

What questions do you have around sales emails?

Personalization? Following up? Need some feedback on a specific email, or an entire rewrite?

Kristina Finseth and I will answer them all, right here in the community.

(Want to chat with us live? Every other Monday at 1pm ET, join our email office hours on Zoom.)

A quick introduction:

I'm Will Allred, Co-founder at Lavender. A real time sales email coach. We help sellers write better emails faster. We see millions of emails per month. This data gives great perspective on what works. I've sat down with hundreds of sellers, marketers, and customer support reps to help them get better with email. Regularly doubling their reply rates.

Kristina Finseth is Head of Growth Marketing at Interseller, a prospecting + outreach platform for recruiters and sellers. Don't let the marketing title fool you—she has build out and leads the outbound SDR team at Interseller and spends lots of time in the weeds prospecting herself. She coaches other SDRs and teams on how to do cold email better, and eve created a course called the Outbound FIRE framework.

Connect w/ me on LinkedIn: /in/williamallred

Connect w/ Kristina on LinkedIn: /in/kristinafinseth

Drop us your email questions below! 👇

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    • 3
      Profile picture of Colin Campbell
      @colin-campbell
      ( 13.8k POINTS )
      10 months, 1 week ago

      Question for Will:
      What is the most common, but easy-to-fix mistake you see reps make when they’re crafting their own email copy.

      Question for Kristina:
      How has your experience in Sales contributed to your success in Growth Marketing? Anything you were surprised about or had to learn when you changed functions?

      • 1
        Profile picture of Will Allred
        @willallred
        ( 1.8k POINTS )
        10 months, 1 week ago

        There’s a few… complexity, formatting, I:You ratios…

        Let’s focus on that last one because it tends to hurt everything else. You is infinitely more potent than Me.

        I find reps fall into a trap.

        They want to sound credible. They want to be comprehensive… so they just start adding more and more to the email.

        That more and more is almost always about them.

        It’s either a feature list, a deep dive on a case study, or some other me me me focused language that puts off your prospect.

        We forget that our prospect doesn’t care.

        I don’t care about your thing. I care about my to-do list.

        It’s hard to fill up a lot of space when you’re using You focused language.

        You know less. That’s okay.

        Their priority is what’s going to drive the response. Not your offering. (counterintuitive… I know)

        Focus on them, ask good questions, and keep it simple.

      • 1
        Profile picture of kristinafinseth
        @kristinafinseth
        ( 501 POINTS )
        10 months, 1 week ago

        Oh man, my experience in sales just made me a better marketer TBH @colin-campbell!

        I considered myself a prolific marketing writer before I did a year long experiment in full-cycle sales. But, being a great marketing writer doesn’t mean you’ll be a great sales copy writer (and unfortunately a lot of companies get that twisted).

        Here are a few things I learned along the way from marketing to sales to growth marketing:

        1. SDRs can be successful under marketing – if given the right support.

        2. Drive revenue, not MQLs. For sales and marketing to be truly aligned – we need to align at the top level goal.

        3. Get really crispy at writing 1:1 sales copy and slightly lose the 1:many marketing copy for the most part. I actually deploy more of an outbound-focused copy strategy on marketing campaigns as well.

    • 3
      Profile picture of Joe Latchaw
      @jlatchaw85
      ( 5.9k POINTS )
      10 months, 1 week ago

      Question: Is there a particular length of sequence that is winning in your organization? Some of ours currently is 18 – 20 steps and I wasn’t sure if that was too long, too short, or on average before being able to obtain an initial meeting.

      Thanks!

      • 1
        Profile picture of Will Allred
        @willallred
        ( 1.8k POINTS )
        10 months, 1 week ago

        Holy moly that’s a lot of steps. I think it’s fair to assume those aren’t all email (which is good).

        The other piece I’m curious about is how are those steps spread out. 20 steps could take 3 months to drip out.

        I like to think of cadences like a HIIT class. I have a reason for reaching out, I stick to that reason for ~4 emails along with some other channels.

        I then give the prospect room to breathe recognizing that it wasn’t necessarily relevant. I come back 30-45 days later with a new reason for reaching out.

        This helps with retention for “what you can help with”. But it also shows that you have confidence in why you reached out.

        I often find that folks drop everything in those first few touchpoints. Hey I’m Joe and here’s everything we can do for you.

        The problem with this is… now what?

        You’ve got nothing else to follow up with other than, “did you see my note.”

        Make sure you’re always adding to the story. Whether you’re reminding them why you reached out (the bump) or you’re adding new insight to the discussion (@kristinafinseth is a pro with this follow up) don’t spill all your candy on the lobby floor.

        Mind sharing what those touch points look like?

        • 2
          Profile picture of kristinafinseth
          @kristinafinseth
          ( 501 POINTS )
          10 months, 1 week ago

          @willallred love and agree with all your advice so far!

          As far as follow-up touchpoints, I’m a big fan of following up without saying “I’m following up.”

          So, eliminating the language like, “Just circling back…” “Just checking in…” “Just bumping this back up in your inbox…” stuff.

          Instead, I like pulling value added follow-ups or taking the approach of a subject matter expert when following up.

          A value add could simply be something like this:

          Hey Will,

          Do you follow Sales Hacker? They recently did this AMA event with Will and Kristina on cold email (the threads were super insightful), and thought I’d share with you.

          With that said, open to getting that intro chat on the calendar yet?

          Cheers,
          Kristina

          yes, I prompt for the call…

        • 1
          Profile picture of Joe Latchaw
          @jlatchaw85
          ( 5.9k POINTS )
          10 months, 1 week ago

          @willallred thanks for your insight… currently, it looks like this:

          Day 1 – View on LinkedIn
          Day 3 – Call
          Day 5 – Send LinkedIn Request
          Day – 7 Follow Up call

          On the even days, emails are sent. I agree it’s a lot of steps so I wasn’t sure what shorter ones looked like.

    • 2
      Profile picture of Ron Dutta
      @rondutta
      ( 831 POINTS )
      10 months, 1 week ago

      Question: how to personalize emails for prospects who aren’t active or on LinkedIn? Also, how many emails should we send before we drop a “breakup email” or would you recommend sending a breakup email to a prospect?

      • 2
        Profile picture of kristinafinseth
        @kristinafinseth
        ( 501 POINTS )
        10 months, 1 week ago

        Ah, great question! When personalizing, we often get stuck on what to use for personalization. That’s why I have my reps and teams I work with focus on the following order of prioritization when it comes to research:

        1. Content the prospect shared or commented on (this is the holy grail, obvs)
        2. Content the company LinkedIn page has shared (think blogs, announcements, etc.)
        3. Company website content (same – blog, announcements, etc.)
        4. Google search results or news alerts (press releases, press-worthy news, etc.)

        ^ It seems like a lot of places to check, but if you stay methodical with it, you can breeze through that order of research in 5 minutes or less.

        Now, if nothing exists on those 4, then you should ALWAYS have a fall-back sequence that’s more “personalized at scale” (i.e. things like first name, company name, etc.) but try to segment geographies or personas to get more granular in that personalization.

        And, take more of a subject matter expert tone (example: “in speaking with other X leaders, they’ve shared they’re experiencing…”).

        Hope this helps!

        For your second question, I don’t like the term “breakup email.” They really should be “bye for now” emails, because unless you get a reply, unsubscribe, or booked meeting – you are going to re-engage them 30+ days later, amiright?!

        But, data I’ve researched on Interseller’s customer-base shows that there is little to zero ROI beyond a 4th email in an initial sequence. I always tell people to stick to 3-4 emails in that burst.

      • 2
        Profile picture of Will Allred
        @willallred
        ( 1.8k POINTS )
        10 months, 1 week ago

        Hey @dutta! I think there’s a common misconception that personalization = personal. The key here is figuring out what’s relevant to them and their business. “Saw you’re hiring” is a fantastic start to an email that doesn’t require them to be active on social media.

        Also- I’m actually not a fan of the “break up”. If I’m “breaking up”, I’m typically asking for a referral to someone else that my message might be more relevant.

    • 2
      Profile picture of William Ballance
      @wmblavender
      ( 290 POINTS )
      10 months, 1 week ago

      How should a seller think about email formatting?

      • 1
        Profile picture of Will Allred
        @willallred
        ( 1.8k POINTS )
        10 months, 1 week ago

        As you know Will, it’s more than formatting. It’s the experience of how they consume the email.

        Today that means:

        1. It will be read on the phone (8x more likely to have an initial open there)

        2. and it means your message will be read for categorization > comprehension

        You HAVE to create white space. We’ve built a great tool in our mobile editor that helps you see how they will see your email.

        But it’s also helpful for this comprehension piece.

        If you haven’t tried the mobile editor, you should, but when in doubt- start a new line of text.

        This white space will also make it easier for people to absorb the content as they’re trying to skim it.

        • 0
          Profile picture of BeccaBlackett
          @beccablackett
          ( 280 POINTS )
          9 months, 2 weeks ago

          Very insightful on mobile readability. Can you provide more insights on the “white space” to make it more appealing to get that full 11 seconds of reading time you mentioned on the podcast today?

    • 2
      Profile picture of Macky Bradley
      @mackybradley
      ( 16k POINTS )
      10 months, 1 week ago

      Hi Will,
      Good morning! What is your opinion on using pre-written emails for email sequences? Is it a good idea, or should they all be personalized?
      How should you approach your email segmentation?
      By revenue size or by individual job title? What has worked best in your experience?
      AND How can an individual improve upon their email writing skills for business, specifically, cold outbound?

      Thank you!
      Looking forward to your AMA!
      Macky B

      • 1
        Profile picture of Will Allred
        @willallred
        ( 1.8k POINTS )
        10 months, 1 week ago

        Hey Macky,

        It depends! If your targeted list is very tailored, you could say the exact same thing to 30 people.

        The key is segmenting by multiple variables. Those variables depend on your business.

        The central variable is always their role + responsibilities. Here’s why:

        Priorities get replies.

        Depending on the size of the company, how the go to market, who they sell to, how they sell… all of those priorities can change.

        The key is figuring out how they change and speaking to those things without necessarily being too “on the nose”. Like fundraising shouldn’t be called out. This may be a trigger for you, but you’ll be one of 1million saying congrats on the recent round.

    • 2
      Profile picture of kristinafinseth
      @kristinafinseth
      ( 501 POINTS )
      10 months, 1 week ago

      SUPER excited to dig into all your questions with @willallred at 2pm EST today! Give us ALL the email related questions here + feel free to share anything you think you’d want reviewed/rewritten!

    • 2
      Profile picture of Jakewood
      @jakewood
      ( 270 POINTS )
      10 months, 1 week ago

      Hey Will and Kristina,

      Do you adjust your outreach strategy depending on size of the company? E.g. length of sequence, time between steps in sequence, approach in the emails , etc.?

      Thanks,
      Jake

      • 1
        Profile picture of kristinafinseth
        @kristinafinseth
        ( 501 POINTS )
        10 months, 1 week ago

        Hey @jakewood great question! I don’t typically adjust the mechanics of the email sequence based on the size of the company. I do have some specific rules when it comes to outreach strategy, even if there are multiple stakeholders the messages could apply to:

        1. My reps only message 1-DM at the company at a time. UNLESS, they are running drastically different email copy. The buzz of everyone getting the same email at the company at the same time is usually not a good thing – especially when they all get the same message.

        2. With cold calls, emails, and social selling touch points involved – I don’t believe anything beyond 10-12 touches in an initial sequence is going to yield much ROI. I say move on to the next.

        ^ here’s what those touches could look something like:

        Step 1, Day 1: Cold Call #1
        Step 2, Day 1: Email #1
        Step 3, Day 2: LinkedIn Connection Request
        Step 4, Day 3: Cold Call #2
        Step 5, Day 4: Email #2
        Step 6, Day 6: LinkedIn Voice Message
        Step 7, Day 7: Cold Call #3
        Step 8, Day 8: Email #3
        Step 9, Day 9: LinkedIn Bump
        Step 10, Day 10: Cold Call #3
        Step 11, Day 12, Email #4 (Final)

        At the end of the day, you don’t want to burn through leads or your Tier 1 accounts. It’s so much harder to come back from an unsubscribe at the domain level by blasting the company versus taking a 1:1 methodical approach.

        Maybe it takes you 3 prospects and 1.5 months to book Walmart, but isn’t it better to play the long game?

        • 0
          Profile picture of Will Allred
          @willallred
          ( 1.8k POINTS )
          10 months, 1 week ago

          Killer tactics, @kristinafinseth!

          Jake- I would focus my sementation on “how the role changes” or “how the responsibilities change”.

          Their inbox is their to-do list. The priority is what gets the response.

          Understanding those priorities is how you build credibility and show them you know them.

          If an SEO expert at a billion dollar company struggles with the same things as someone at a startup… why segment?

    • 2
      Profile picture of Samantha Hembree
      @sam-hembree
      ( 8.3k POINTS )
      10 months, 1 week ago

      Curious if you two have a preferred formula for a great cold email?

      For example, Josh Braun has a 4 sentence formula: 1) Truth 2) Think 3) Third party credibility 4) Talk

      • 1
        Profile picture of kristinafinseth
        @kristinafinseth
        ( 501 POINTS )
        10 months, 1 week ago

        Hey @sam-hembree, great question!

        I’m not a big fan of having a set, preferred formula TBH.

        Here are the components I think make up a great cold email:

        1. Personalization (not just custom fields here).
        2. Simplicity – keep the language simple + speak in their language, with their lingo.
        3. Come across as a subject matter expert.
        4. Work smarter, not harder and use building block templates (changing key components of copy – AKA whole personalized sentences) each time to keep content fresh + deliverable.

        ^ For #3 above, when in doubt and personalization isn’t accessible, I use the fall-back. And that fall-back (and the same advice goes for all follow-up touch points) is to come across as a subject matter expert.

        Using language like…

        Hi Will,

        In talking with other tech founders, two of the problems they’re experiencing are:
        – scaling the team at the right time with the right roles
        – prioritizing net new revenue vs. retention revenue

        We’re helping companies like (similar company) scale smarter and faster with our X platform.

        Is this something you struggle with, open to a quick chat?

        Cheers,
        Kristina

        For one, it shows that you are talking to people in their shoes. It’s relatable.

        I’m sure @willallred has some things to add here.

        • 0
          Profile picture of Will Allred
          @willallred
          ( 1.8k POINTS )
          10 months, 1 week ago

          Kristina nailed the basics. Keep it simple. Make it personal. Keep it easy to read (add whitespace)

          I don’t necessarily think of it as “one way” is better than others. @jasonbay posted a great video to LinkedIn the other day about “Chunking”.

          The concept is simple:

          Take the frameworks at principles. Not tactics. Understand why they work, and shape them for you and your needs.

    • 2
      Profile picture of melissaabrantes
      @melissaabrantes
      ( 190 POINTS )
      10 months, 1 week ago

      What best practices are there for follow up emails / messaging?

      • 1
        Profile picture of kristinafinseth
        @kristinafinseth
        ( 501 POINTS )
        10 months, 1 week ago

        Hey @melissaabrantes, so many best practices, but I’m a big fan of keeping the follow-up as more of a value-add or insight-add versus calling out that it’s a follow-up.

        So, some general best practices here:

        1. Reply in thread for your entire sequence. It keeps the story together and if someone genuinely missed one of your emails, they can refer back (especially if you took time to really personalize that first touch).

        2. Refrain from using language like, just following up, just circling back, just checking back in, just bumping back up my first email… it adds zero value and everyone expects it.

        Here’s an example of a follow-up email that works:

        Hey Will,

        Do you follow Sales Hacker? They recently did this AMA event with Will and Kristina on cold email (the threads were super insightful), and thought I’d share with you.

        With that said, open to getting that intro chat on the calendar yet?

        Cheers,
        Kristina

        Hope this helps Melissa!

        • 1
          Profile picture of Will Allred
          @willallred
          ( 1.8k POINTS )
          10 months, 1 week ago

          I love this, Kristina!

          I think of follow ups in three categories:

          1. Restating why you reached out (the bump)
          2. Asking them for a referral (delegate)
          3. Add Value (Kristina’s example)

          All three are effective. It’s just about lacing them together around a central reason for why you reached out.

    • 1
      Profile picture of Peri
      @peri
      ( 265 POINTS )
      10 months, 1 week ago

      Hi @willallred and @kristinafinseth!

      I recently joined a sales team as a Sales Development Representative. Wanted to get your advice regarding the SDR journey.

      Which resources helped you form your outreach strategy? (Would really appreciate if you could share a few)
      What are the best practices for reaching out to your customers for the first time on social media channels, like LinkedIn? What are the things we should keep in mind in cases like this?

      Best,
      Peri

      • 1
        Profile picture of kristinafinseth
        @kristinafinseth
        ( 501 POINTS )
        10 months, 1 week ago

        Hi @peri – first of all, congrats on the SDR role! That’s exciting 🙂

        I lead a SDR team here at Interseller, so I’m a big fan of knowing your resources. But, it is noisy out there, and I will put a disclaimer that you can get super wrapped up in consuming a lot of content.

        Sometimes it leads to spinning your wheels or not really knowing where to start (which is okay too, by the way).

        My go-to people/resources for outreach strategy include:
        @willallred (he graciously does SDR outreach 1:1s)
        – Jason Bay is a great outreach leader to follow
        – Sales Hacker puts out great content and so does SDR Nation

        For best practices on social outreach, specifically LinkedIn, it’s all about the long game.
        – don’t connect and pitch
        – don’t pitch in the connection request
        – connect with a personalized note (personally, I have a 40%+ connect accept rate personalizing)
        – spend a few days engaging with content or staying connected
        – drop LinkedIn voice message 4-5 days after connecting
        – follow-up with a GIF bump 3-4 days after the voice message

        Your voice message could look something like this (my script):

        “Hi Will, thanks again for accepting my connection request. Excited to have you in my network. In case you haven’t connected the dots, I’ve also sent you a couple of emails, and I’m interested in understanding how you and your team are currently sourcing + communicating with passive talent. Selfishly, I’d love the opportunity to share how Interseller might fit in to help streamline that process. If this is top of mind for you and you’re open to a quick chat, let me know. Otherwise, looking forward to staying in touch.”

        Let me know if this is helpful or if you have any follow-up questions here!

    • 1
      Profile picture of Candyce Edelen
      @candyce
      ( 2.4k POINTS )
      10 months ago

      I’ve got a question about email sequences. In my case, the lead has explicitly subscribed to my sequence of tips on using LinkedIn for prospecting. Each email includes a LinkedIn prospecting tip (all the content in the email, so no click required). Then it offers info about my training program. Conversions on the sequence are decent (39.5% open rate, 17.6% open to click ratio, 15.6% of subscribers have bought), but I’d like to improve the ratios. Also, these ratios are all-time, and have actually been declining in recent months (my email system doesn’t have much in the way of stats that help me figure this out).

      I get really positive feedback on the value of the emails. But I’m wondering how long a sequence like this should be? I’m not in a tech business where it makes sense to give away endless amounts of information.

      Any thoughts would be welcome!

      • 0
        Profile picture of kristinafinseth
        @kristinafinseth
        ( 501 POINTS )
        10 months ago

        Great question @candyce! And I do have a few things I picked up from what you’ve shared in your explanation:

        1 – You mentioned your email stats of all-time and that they’ve been declining in recent months. My first thought is “this could be a deliverability issue” so I’m curious…have you been using the same copy for the lifetime of this email sequence? If so, you probably need to refresh it to get your deliverability back up.

        2 – I would honestly focus on giving away some value (obviously not all of it) and try to fit 3 value-adds into 3 separate touch points. A 4th touch point or email could focus on a stronger conversion (i.e. if you like the tips you’ve received, you should enroll in my training program to take it to the next level…)

        3 – For you, P.S. real estate can be SUPER powerful for plugging your training program without deterring from the main value add message in the body of your email. You could use a screenshot of someone reviewing the training program, a testimonial quote, some stats on how your training program helped improve LinkedIn prospecting for one of your clients (you get the point).

        Hope this helps!!

        P.S. This is super relevant, because I do a 3-4 email drip for my cold email course, so I’m trying to apply some of that approach to what you’re doing with your training program.

        Anything to add here @willallred?

    • 1
      Profile picture of Will Allred
      @willallred
      ( 1.8k POINTS )
      10 months, 1 week ago

      Hello! Just jumping in here w/ Kristina. Awesome questions to get us started. Should see answers filling in shortly.

    • 1
      Profile picture of elamrani
      @elamrani
      ( 216 POINTS )
      10 months, 1 week ago

      At what step in your sequence do you start sending content to your prospect? for :

      Person A: They opened your emails many times but didn’t reply

      Person B: They were interested at some point, but they’re not opening your follow-ups

      Thank you.

      • 1
        Profile picture of kristinafinseth
        @kristinafinseth
        ( 501 POINTS )
        10 months, 1 week ago

        Hey @elamrani – great question!

        Honestly, I’m not a big fan of sending company-generated content to prospects (unless they ask for it).

        You’re much better off sending over content (blog, article, video, etc.) from a third-party reputable source that your prospects probably already know and trust (think Forbes, Harvard Business Review, or an industry-specific / person-specific publication).

        If Person A is opening my emails a bunch of times but not replying, I’m picking up the phone or hitting them up on LinkedIn to take it multi-channel.

        If Person B expressed interest at some point, but they aren’t opening my follow-ups, I’ll do the same thing as Person A. You could also get cheeky with a follow-up email that says…

        “Hey Will, what’s your best advice for someone who’s ghosting you? Asking for a friend.”

        Hope this helps!

    • 1
      Profile picture of Nathan Farrish
      @ptsalesguy
      ( 312 POINTS )
      10 months, 1 week ago

      Hey Kristina and Will,

      Question for you:

      Have you any advice on email cadences following Webinars, and separately for Free trial users?

      Ie., What would your focus be for each successive step, and how far apart would you space them?

      I am a one-man AE team and can automate much of this through Hubspot, but I’d like to hone in on a more customized approach when people first sign up for our trial, and right after attending a webinar.

      For context, we sell a client engagement platform to Studio/boutique gym owners. These are warm leads that generally all need some help with their online services due to CV19.

      So the question is, what are you seeing work for other tech companies in regards to increasing reply rates and booking meetings?

      • 2
        Profile picture of kristinafinseth
        @kristinafinseth
        ( 501 POINTS )
        10 months, 1 week ago

        Hey @ptsalesguy (Nathan) – great questions.

        Coming from the marketing side, I’m a huge fan of applying more of an outbound-driven approach to email sequences like webinar follow-ups, free trial users, etc.

        Some things to think about with free trial users:

        1. Size of the trial account (i.e. do they need a super white glove because it’s a tier 1 account, or is it something you’d like to convert but not allocate as much time to?)

        2. What’s the goal with free trial users? Is it to convert to a demo? Is it to get product adoption and convert to a paid customer?

        3. Do you have the ability to segment based on product triggers or actions?

        ^ #3 is really important, because if you want to get super sticky with your sequences for people in trial and get them to success – you’ll want to focus on those product triggers.

        An example would be if they imported a CSV file into your platform… a message would trigger to say, “Hey, saw you imported a CSV file. Did you get a chance to use the CSV template to make that import easier? Here’s how you do X next…”

        For webinar follow-ups, I’m a big fan of 2-3 touch follow-up process here. The first touch should be the SDR or sales person or marketer sharing the recording and any other assets.

        A second and third touch could be a call and another email trying to convert them to try the product or speak with the team.

        Or you could just take a longer form nurturing approach for those non-hot or tier 1 accounts as well by just sending over additional value-added content based on where they are at in the funnel.

      • 2
        Profile picture of Will Allred
        @willallred
        ( 1.8k POINTS )
        10 months, 1 week ago

        Big fan of Kristina’s follow up on Webinars. We see a lot of free trials at Lavender, so I’ll focus my thinking there.

        Rethink selling into customer success.

        With a trial, you want the product to do the work for you. Your job is to enable to the product to do that work.

        Ask them how the trial is going. Send them helpful resources along the way. Don’t be afraid to offer time to help them get more out of the trial.

        They’re already trialing, get ahead of the inevitable moment when the trial ends and build a relationship.

    • 1
      Profile picture of Samantha Hembree
      @sam-hembree
      ( 8.3k POINTS )
      10 months, 1 week ago

      So excited to see the questions and answers that come through today!

      I think @candyce @lucycollier @terezatexlova @ericlklein may like to particpate! @katie_ray who else? 😁

    • 0
      Profile picture of BeccaBlackett
      @beccablackett
      ( 280 POINTS )
      9 months, 2 weeks ago

      Is it kitschy or best practice to bold/underline/italicize or change fonts for important “buzz words” to stand out during an email? Suggestions for keeping noticeable “White Space” in emails read on mobile devices (i.e. Bulleting)?

    • 0
      Profile picture of swolschon
      @swolschon
      ( 330 POINTS )
      6 months, 1 week ago

      Question: How do you limit the time needed to deal with “bad” replies (e.g. people that are not responsible)? Or “good” replies (like referrals) that generate a lot of admin work.

      I’m referring to data management here, keeing your CRM up to date.

      With automatic email prospecting, we are dealing with a very high admin workload just to keep the data current.

      Do you have any recommendations how to best deal with necessary admin and focus on the leads that bing value?

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